1. Ezra Stoller: Times Square VE - VJ Day, New York, 1945

     

  2. Ezra Stoller: Guggenheim museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, NY, ca.1959

     


  3. Photography is space, light, texture, of course, but the really important element is time - that nanosecond when the image organizes itself on the ground glass.
    — Ezra Stoller
     

  4. Ezra Stoller: United Nations, International Team of Architects Led by Wallace K. Harrison, New York, NY, 1954

     


  5. Ezra Stoller (1915 - 2004)

    Ezra Stoller was born in Chicago in 1915, grew up in New York and studied architecture at NYU. As a student, he began photographing buildings, models and sculpture; in 1938, he graduated with a BFA in Industrial Design. In 1940-1941, Stoller worked with the photographer Paul Strand in the Office of Emergency Management; he was drafted in 1942 and was a photographer at the Army Signal Corps Photo Center. After World War II, Stoller continued his career as an architectural photographer and also focused on industrial and scientific commissions. Over the next forty years, he became best known for images of buildings.

    Many modern buildings are recognized and remembered by the images Stoller created as he was uniquely able to visualize the formal and spatial aspirations of Modern architecture. During his long career as an architectural photographer, Stoller worked closely with many of the period’s leading architects including Frank Lloyd Wright, Paul Rudolph, Marcel Breuer, I.M. Pei, Gordon Bunshaft, Eero Saarinen, Richard Meier and Mies van der Rohe, among others.

    His archive of more than 50,000 images is a record of industry and innovation, expressed through the muscular buildings, busy factory workers, and sweeping lines of mid-century America. Shooting in both color and black-and-white, Stoller was exquisitely attuned to the buildings and spaces he photographed - framing them with precise attention to vantage point, lighting conditions, and the unique qualities of their form. He could effectively encompass an entire architectural work, or the sweep of a factory floor, or break them down into magnificent details and poetic visual fragments.

    Stoller died in Williamstown, Massachusetts, in 2004, at 89 years of age.

     

  6. Ezra Stoller: TWA Terminal at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport by Eero Saarinen, New York, N.Y., 1962

     

  7. Ezra Stoller: Inside view of Guggenheim museum designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, New York, ca. 1959

     

  8. Ezra Stoller: Hirshhorn Museum, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Washington, D.C, 1974

     

  9. Ezra Stoller: United Nations by International Team of Architects Led by Wallace K. Harrison, New York, N.Y., 1952

     

  10. Ezra Stoller: TWA Terminal at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport by Eero Saarinen, New York, N.Y., 1962